Why Twitter #music Should Only Be Considered a Small First Step

By ajcolores

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So finally Twitter leveraged its We Are Hunted acquisition and today launched the much expected, if not necessarily much anticipated, Twitter #music.  I say ‘not necessarily much anticipated’ not so much because Twitter isn’t a big deal in the digital music ecosystem (it is) but more because few expected Twitter to do anything particularly groundbreaking here.

Making Twitter’s Music Experience 3 Dimensional

Twitter #music is a neat integration of Twitter music content, such as artists’ Twitter accounts and tweets, integrated with iTunes previews streams and (for Rdio and Spotify users) full audio playback.  All of which undoubtedly brings genuine additional value and turns the Twitter music experience from something pretty superficial and two dimensional into a three dimensional music experience.  But in doing so (some nice UI and discovery algorithms aside) Twitter is essentially just doing a Facebook.  It is leveraging its audience’s behavior as a navigational front end for existing music services.

This is of course a good thing, pulling together the disparate social, graphic and audio elements of the digital music landscape into a cohesive whole.  But it is also so much less than what Twitter, Facebook and Google+ could and should do.

What Twitter, Facebook and Google+ Could and Should Do

Between them Twitter, Facebook and Google+ have a cumulative 2 billion registered users and 1.5 billion cumulative active users.  In short, just about every online and mobile music fan.  These three social powerhouses between them also provide homes to the majority of artists online. This sort of power, influence and reach is staggering. And yet so far all that the three have seen fit to do is plug into other music services.

Now that might be the most sensible core plank of their respective digital music strategies, but there is also so much more that they could do that would complement, and add to the core digital music services currently in market.

For example:

  • Google+ could create a standard ‘plug and play’ portfolio of creative tools such as remix, karaoke and live jamming apps that artists and fans could plug into hangouts and profiles
  • Twitter could allow fans to follow the journey of a song from its original tweet right through to how it got to them
  • Facebook could create a virtual jukebox app that would use Gracenote database look-ups to create service-agnostic playlist and digital collection data from users streamed music that would auto-port to any other music service via Facebook

These are all of course tactics, not strategies, but collectively they add up to something much bigger.  The strategy of the social powerhouses has to be: bring new, unique value that genuinely moves the needle.  Simply creating another suite of discovery tools is not enough. Twitter #music adds audio to the visual music discovery journey and in doing do runs the risk of making much of the discovery journey the destination.  Which is great from a user perspective, but much less so for artists and labels unless some robust additional commercial models are added.  The harsh reality is that if you give a social user too much value in the social context, the opportunity for converting engagement into transaction is reduced.

The digital music market needs social’s big three to start ramping up their respective music games. Twitter #music is a cute first step, but not the end game.


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